“I wish I could talk in Technicolor” LSD In The 50s


A mental health video of a housewife from the 50s on LSD is being passed around on the Internets right now. I couldn’t put my finger on what was so spectacular about the video until a friend wrote this:

Seeing someone with absolutely no context or expectations for this experience is fascinating.

I agree Joe, I agree.

Watch the clip.

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What is Soto Zen?


From the Soto Zen Buddhist Association. ( Bolding is all me though)

What is Soto Zen? Soto Zen was developed in the ninth century by the Chinese Monks Tozan (Ch. Dongshan) and Sozan (Ch. Caoshan), the first syllables of their names making up the subsequent name of the school. It stressed doing meditation without a goal, as everyone is already inherently enlightened. Seated, silent meditation is an expression of this.

Soto Zen Buddhism is distinguished by its focus on the down-to-earth practice of “everyday zen.” It encourages awareness of the workings of one’s own mind as a means of living mindfully in all areas of daily life – at home, at work and in the community.

In his “Instructions for the Cook,” Dogen taught that cooking and caring for other people were as important as sitting zazen and chanting sutras.

Soto Zen is for those who want to practice Zen in everything they do. In coming face to face with their life in all its aspects, they come to know themselves and find their relationship to all other things. They learn to be truly here and to serve in all ways.

You can find a center near you, if you’re intrigued, on the Soto Zen Buddhist Association website.

Informal Poll: What does not kill me….


Image via reddit.com

The Uses of Pleasure and Pain


Look at what the Buddha has to say about the tasks with regard to each of the noble truths. The task with regard to stress and suffering is to comprehend it. The task with regard to the path is to develop it, which means you want to develop that sense of ease, the sense of rapture that comes as the mind begins to settle down in concentration. What you’re doing is taking one of the aggregates — the aggregate of feeling — and instead of latching onto it or pushing it away, you learn how to use it as a tool.

When pain and stress and suffering come, you want to comprehend them. Comprehending pain and stress teaches you a lot about the mind. The Buddha never said that life is suffering. He just said there’s suffering in life, which is a very different teaching. As long as there’s going to be pain, as long as there’s going to be suffering, get the most use out of them. You find as you focus on pain — as you get to know it, get to comprehend it — that you learn all kinds of things about how the mind is working. In particular, you learn to see what it’s doing to take a physical pain and turn it into mental pain — or, if you’re starting with mental pain, to make it worse.

What we’re doing is taking one of the aggregates that we usually cling to… Clinging here doesn’t mean just holding on. It also means trying to push away, and pushing away is like pushing away a glob of tar. The more you push it away, the more you get stuck. So instead of clinging or pushing away, we try to learn how to use these aggregates as tools, in the same way you’d use tar to make asphalt for paving a road.

This is a common theme running throughout the Buddha’s teachings: Before you can let go of anything, you have to learn how to master it. Otherwise, you’re just holding on, pushing away, holding on, pushing away. And nothing comes from that except more stress, more suffering, more pain. This harms not only you but also the people around you. If you’re constantly feeling worn down by the pains and the inconveniences of life, you’ll find it hard to be kind to other people. In fact, most of the evil things people do in their lives come from their sense of being totally overwhelmed, feeling weak and trapped and then lashing out.

But if you give the mind the sense of strength and security that comes with knowing it has a center it can return to and gain nourishment from, it’s a gift not only to yourself but also to the people around you. It’s not a selfish practice.

Learn how not to hold onto feelings, grabbing hold of the pleasant ones, pushing the painful ones away. Instead, learn how to use them as tools. When they’re used as tools, they open things up in the mind. You understand where the mind is unskillful in how it manages its thinking, and you realize that you don’t have to be unskillful. There are better ways to think, better ways to manage the thought processes in the mind.

And a funny thing happens. As you master these processes, they bring you to a point where everything reaches equilibrium. That’s where you can really let go. You can even let go of your tools at that point because they’ve taken you where you want to go. From that point on, everything opens up to the Deathless.

But you can’t get there by pushing and pulling your way around. If the Deathless were something you could force your way into, everybody would have gone to nibbana a long time ago. It requires a lot of finesse, a lot of skill in how you deal with the mind, learning to recognize the time for analyzing issues of stress and suffering, and the time for letting the mind rest so it that it can gain strength and then go back to work.

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Read this in its entirety here.

How To Deal with Anger, Mindfully: Step-by-Step


As I was writing one of the highest viewed articles on this website, “How to Deal With Anger, Mindfully,” I realized that the advice written may be beyond the ability of some readers.

In a nutshell, what if the reader couldn’t even deal with their anger because they couldn’t even accept themselves having anger (suppression). Or what if they could accept their anger but they got stuck there; unable to get past the stage where anger helps them understand their feelings and grow from the experience?

What could I do for those readers?

I decided to dig through the most current literature on anger from the worlds of psychology, mindfulness, and neuroscience and compile what I discovered in a step-by-step guide that can hopefully help readers tend to their anger mindfully from the beginnings of anger to the end.

The guide touches on why you shouldn’t suppress your anger, how to keep your anger in check, how to understand your anger, and more. The steps are listed in logical order, but you should feel free to start wherever you feel like you need to start.

Step 1: Learn what not to do. [link]

Step 2: Slow down your anger response. [link]

Step 3: Do self-compassion. [link]

Step 4: Understand your anger. [link]

Step 5: Label your emotions. [link]

Step 6: Expand your vocabulary. [link]

Happy Birthday LSD!


I had planned to post something different; however, when I looked for the book resource I needed, it wasn’t available for reading on Google Books. Normally I would be fine with that, it’s the publisher’s right to not allow information to be shared. With that said, this was a book written in 1938, by what f*%^king reason do you still allow that book to not be shared?

I brought the book on Amazon for $2.21 instead. Hope y’all are happy with your 2 dollars.

Moving on …

On November 16th, 1938, Dr. Albert Hofmann synthesized lysergic acid diethylamide or LSD, for the first time. Happy BIrthday LSD, you’ve captured and inspired many.

Want more hallucinogenic reading? Consider reading Psychedelics and Your Brain. [link]